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Title:
Eamon Donnelly's MILK BARS!
Milkshakes, Memories & Mixed Lollies

The Big Bonza Book of Milk Bars!


300+ page hard cover coffee table photographic book
Curated, photographed, designed and written by Eamon Donnelly with contributions from past and present owners, family photographs, memories and the history of the Milk Bar.

The shopfronts, the interiors, the memories, the families and sun kissed signs of a faded summers past.

Coming in 2017!
Sign up to the mailing list or
follow @milkbars_ for updates on the book, launch, publication dates

The Milk Bar is an Australian invention, a suburban icon, part of the Australian vernacular.

Mum, Cousins and me on the right sipping a Fanta in a long gone Geelong city Milk Bar on Ryrie Street possibly in the old Sale Yards Building, 1985 – 87. Photo credit: Malcolm Donnelly

Mum, Cousins and me on the right sipping a Fanta in a long gone Geelong city Milk Bar on Ryrie Street possibly in the old Sale Yards Building, 1985 – 87. Photo credit: Malcolm Donnelly

Me on the left outside the long gone ‘Busy Bee’ Milk Bar, East Geelong, Victoria, circa 1982-83. Photo credit: Malcolm Donnelly

Me on the left outside the long gone ‘Busy Bee’ Milk Bar, East Geelong, Victoria, circa 1982-83. Photo credit: Malcolm Donnelly

A long forgotten Milk Bar sign in the Western Suburbs of Sydney, 2014.  Photo: Eamon Donnelly

A long forgotten Milk Bar sign in the Western Suburbs of Sydney, 2014. 
Photo: Eamon Donnelly

The Milk Bars Project started one day about 15 years or so ago in around 2001 when I was getting all nostalgic for my 1980s childhood growing up in East Geelong, Victoria. We lived in a small Victorian weatherboard cottage on a main road, McKillop Street, surrounded by old neighbours with blue rinses, concrete stalks, tyre swans, incredible veggie patches and back lanes. It was a golden childhood. In 1990 we moved to the other side of town and built a house on a block of land and this new development area was without Milk Bars, old neighbours and history. I was born in 1981 so this time in East Geelong was my 1980s childhood. When I was looking back at this time in my early 20s I took a trip to back to my childhood suburb of East Geelong. I wanted to walk down that footpath, peek through the picket fence and walk down the back lane.

One of the strongest memories I have of my childhood there were visits to the corner Milk Bar. Owned by Dave and Peggy, we simply called it ‘Dave’s’. Riding down the lane to the corner to buy 1 and 2 cent mixed lollies, a milkshake, a sausage roll or an ice cream was heaven. Mum even worked for the new owners in the late 1980s when Dave and Peggy sold up and opened a Take Away in North Geelong called the Nose Bag (named after the feed-bags horses wear) Sadly, on this trip down memory lane I discovered ‘Dave’s’ my old childhood Corner Milk Bar had long closed sometime in the late 1990s and only a rusted old tin sign for The Sun newspaper remained on the awning. For prosperity and childhood nostalgia, armed with a low-pixel digital camera I took a photograph of the building, which sparked my interest in the other Milk Bars that we walked to from home, were they still there? To my disappointment they were also closed, many with no traces of the shop to be seen except for a personal memory. This made me realise that something had happened within our suburban landscape. The Australian Milk Bar was quietly fading away without anyone noticing, an Australian icon was disappearing like an ice cream melting in the hot summers sun. I had still visited Milk Bars over the years but hadn’t really noticed a change until that day. I had always imagined Dave’s would still be there.

Dave's Milk Bar, aka Hawking's Corner Store, East Geelong, 2001. The first photograph I took in the project of my childhood Milk Bar.

Dave's Milk Bar, aka Hawking's Corner Store, East Geelong, 2001. The first photograph I took in the project of my childhood Milk Bar.

Gavin standing proudly behind the counter in my childhood Milk Bar in East Geelong, circa 1988-1990. Originally owned by David & Peggy Hawking. Photographer unknown

Gavin standing proudly behind the counter in my childhood Milk Bar in East Geelong, circa 1988-1990. Originally owned by David & Peggy Hawking. Photographer unknown

Hotham Street Milk Bar, Balaclava, before a new paint job. 2009. Photo: Eamon Donnelly.

Hotham Street Milk Bar, Balaclava, before a new paint job. 2009.
Photo: Eamon Donnelly.

As an artist, designer and illustrator my work is heavily influenced by the Australia I grew up in. The 1980s with remnants of 1970s culture, an industrial town with a clash of surf culture, bright summer colours and a suburban childhood. I am always looking for an Australian visual language so old advertising on the side of a closed Milk Bar is part of that narrative. The Milk Bar represented an Australian culture that was disappearing. The Milk Bar was the physical manifestation of the cultural themes I had been exploring in my work, the Australian vernacular of the 1980s and prior. So I began a small photo archive of Milk Bars, Mixed Businesses and Corner Stores on Polaroid film a few years later, trying to preserve something that I loved and 'collecting' the last of the Milk Bars. Since then this personal project has turned into a large archive, of the signage, the fading paint on the awnings, the decaying facades of the buildings and in recent years the cultures and families that dwell within them. The result is a compelling visual diary of suburban Australia, of family business, the migrant story, of a landscape that is changing with so much rich history. 

To me the Milk Bar is ‘Australia’ condensed to a corner business. It was family, community, friendly service and the migrant success story. This was the place you discussed the latest news from the street corner to the other side of the world, you bought the weekly food supplies and received life advice from the owners who knew your name. You watched the owner’s children grow up and in turn they watched yours grow with them. The Milk Bars Project to capture these fading stores began with that fateful trip to my closed childhood Milk Bar 15 years ago. The project has grown over the past 15 years to an archive of around 300+ shops with thousands of images of signage, faded awning, stickers, decals and interiors some of which I have released as signed and numbered limited edition fine art prints available on this site in the shop. And after being interviewed in a press article about the project, the greatest thing happened. The daughter of my childhood Milk Bar Dave’s got in touch after I mentioned my memories of their store and her parents Dave and Peggy Hawking, the store, I found out, was actually called Hawking’s Corner Store! This was a very special and incredible connection to make from a small personal photo project, I feel it has come full circle. It had taken me back to the 1980s and my childhood. In East Geelong on those Saturdays riding up to the Milk Bar. The project has an incredible personal depth, everyone has a memory of their own childhood Milk Bar and it engages an audience that spans multiple generations. It is a story of migration, food, small business, childhood, community, suburban life, summer, mixed lolly memories and a celebration of the hard working Australian families that ran their Milk Bars.

Family friend Jerome in his shop “Dundees” in Hervey Bay, 1989, now an IGA. Photo credit: Malcolm Donnelly.

Family friend Jerome in his shop “Dundees” in Hervey Bay, 1989, now an IGA. Photo credit: Malcolm Donnelly.

Milk Bars, Mixed Businesses and Corner Stores in NSW and Victoria from 2014. Photos: Eamon Donnelly

Milk Bars, Mixed Businesses and Corner Stores in NSW and Victoria from 2014. Photos: Eamon Donnelly

A closed Commercial Road, Praharan Milk Bar from 2008. Photo: Eamon Donnelly

A closed Commercial Road, Praharan Milk Bar from 2008.
Photo: Eamon Donnelly

In 2012 I launched a website called The Island Continent, an online archive for my personal collection of Australian ephemera, media and photography and pop culture. The site gave me a platform to share my Milk Bar archive away from my day to day work as an illustrator and designer. The Milk Bars posts have become the most visited pages and along with my original small self-published book titled Milkbar: A Photographic Archive Vol 1. people really resonated with this nostalgia from their childhood. The book was acquired by The State Library of Victoria and the Melbourne Museum Library for their collections and sold out of 500 copies since its release. Since then I have spoken about Milk Bars on ABC Radio in Melbourne, 3AW with Bruce Mansfield and Philip Brady, 2SER in Sydney, interviewed about the project for The Age, Daily Telegraph, The Australian and The Weekly Review, Channel 31. This was incredible and unexpected but now . After the success of the first book I had planned to self publish 2 further volumes of my photography, but following the overwhelming public response I abandoned these humble plans for something bigger. I wanted to compile these incredible micro histories, connections I had made and tell the story of the Milk Bar. So I put out a call in January 2013 for contributions to the project. Stories, photos, memories of past and present Milk Bar owners and customers. Since then I have been in contact with a dozen families who have generously shared their memories and old family photographs. Their incredible stories only reinforced my perception that the Milk Bar was more than just a place to buy your milk and bread but held significant cultural importance about the Australian way of life and where it was going.

In 2014 I began to look outside of my home state Victoria and travelled to NSW up the Hume Highway, stopping off at all of the small regional towns on the trip to Sydney where I explored the suburbs, shooting more Milk Bars and speaking to more owners. The photographs were featured that year on 500 banners across Sydney for City of Sydney's Art & About Festival and the stories and connections continued. Channel 9’s The Today Show featured the photography and the project, inviting viewers to share their old photographs and memories of Milk Bar. Their post on Facebook that day received 2,600 likes and 700 comments from viewers sharing their Milk bar memories and photographs, which they also featured on the show that morning. And as part of the festival I spoke at a panel discussing Milk Bars at Sydney’s Customs House Library alongside Australia's first and foremost Greek Cafe and Milk Bar historian Leonard Janiszewski, who along with his research colleague, documentary photographer Effy Alexakis, has been researching the birth of the Milk Bar and Greek Cafe's since 1981. In 2015 I spoke at The National Gallery of Australia in Canberra about the project and my archive and art at the 8th Print Symposium conference. 

Louie's Corner Store, Wollongong, 2014. Photo: Eamon Donnelly

Louie's Corner Store, Wollongong, 2014. Photo: Eamon Donnelly

The Forgot What? Milk Bar, with the bonza tagline - "Food that makes you go MM" Prahran, 2010. Photo: Eamon Donnelly

The Forgot What? Milk Bar, with the bonza tagline - "Food that makes you go MM" Prahran, 2010. Photo: Eamon Donnelly

Milk Bars, Mixed Businesses and Corner Stores in NSW and Victoria from 2014. Photos: Eamon Donnelly

Milk Bars, Mixed Businesses and Corner Stores in NSW and Victoria from 2014. Photos: Eamon Donnelly

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Purchase Signed and Numbered Limited Edition Fine Art Prints from
Eamon Donnelly's Milk Bar Project 2001 - 2016. 

 
 
 
 
My illustrated Milk Bars themed home page for my website from 2008 - 2012. 'Eamo's Milk Bar'

My illustrated Milk Bars themed home page for my website from 2008 - 2012. 'Eamo's Milk Bar'

About me
My name is Eamon Donnelly (born 1981) an Illustrator, Designer, Artist, Photographer and obsessed Australian cultural Archivist. I am recognised nationally for my Milk Bar photography project and for my artworks which draw upon the Australian vernacular of the 1980s. I have exhibited my work in Australia, UK and the USA with three solo exhibitions in Melbourne and Sydney, spoken at various design conferences and illustrated for a variety of international brands and publications including Rolling Stone, Newsweek, Billboard, Mens Health, Bloomberg Businessweek, Complex, ESPN, GQ, Runners World, Golden Plains Festival, Rip Curl, Red Bull, Mountain Dew, Maxim, Advertising Age, VH1 and Playboy. Drawing on my vast personal archive of Australian culture, I launched a website called The Island Continent in 2012, an online archive for the Australian image, culture and history. I have spent the last 30 years collecting an expansive archive of Australian art, design, photography, literature, popular culture, Television and Commercials, much of which has been the basis for my inspiration as an artist and illustrator. I am dedicated to documenting Australia’s changing cultural landscape and ensuring that its history, visual language and cultural stories are preserved for generations to come.

Photo by Mark Lobo, 2014

Photo by Mark Lobo, 2014

Milk Bars Project Exhibitions
Art & About, Sydney, "The Milk Bar" Banner Gallery Artist, 2014
"Shop Here For Value & Friendly Service" Carbon Black Gallery, Prahran, Melbourne, 2013
"Health Food Of A Nation!" Lamington Drive Gallery, Melbourne, 2010

George Street, Sydney. Photographs from The Milk Bars Project adorned 520 flag banners across Sydney’s streets for the Art & About festival in 2014.

George Street, Sydney. Photographs from The Milk Bars Project adorned 520 flag banners across Sydney’s streets for the Art & About festival in 2014.

William Street next to Hyde Park.  

William Street next to Hyde Park.

 

William Street Mixed Biz, Sydney. Art & About festival in 2014. 

William Street Mixed Biz, Sydney.
Art & About festival in 2014. 

Banners lining Martin Place, this was were the first Milk Bar opened in 1932, the Black & White 4d Milk Bar. 

Banners lining Martin Place, this was were the first Milk Bar opened in 1932, the Black & White 4d Milk Bar. 

Final 100 Banner crops from the Milk Bar photography project’s 10 year archive. 

Final 100 Banner crops from the Milk Bar photography project’s 10 year archive. 

Milk Bars Project Press
The Design Files. Milk Bars Project & Book feature
2SER 107.3 Sydney, 11th October 2014. Australian Milk Bar Panel
The Sunday Telegraph, 21st September 2014.
Milk Bars bring back the joys of the past in photographic exhibition in Sydney -
The Weekend Australian, 20th September, 2014. Melbourne illustrator preserves the suburban Milk Bar 2SER 107.3 Sydney, 20th September 2014. Art & About The Milk Bar
Geelong Advertiser, 13th September 2014. Streets of our past
3AW, Nightline with Bruce Mansfield and Philip Brady. Talking Milk Bars
Inside Art TV, Channel 31, 11th March 2013. Eamon Donnelly’s Milk Bar Memorial
ABC 774 Melbourne. Evenings with Lindy Burns. Guest interview on Milk Bars
Broadsheet, Shop here for value and friendly service. Exhibition review, Tara Kenny
Triple RRR, Guest on radio show The Urbanists -
Discussing the Australia Milk Bar and it’s history & cultural significance
The Age, October 27th 2012. Long Goodbye to a Suburban Icon by Chris Johnston
Threethousand, 2012. Milkbar: A Photographic Archive Vol. Book review by Oscar Schwartz
The Age. Living in the 70’s
The Design Files. The Island Continent feature

Milk Bars, Mixed Businesses and Corner Stores in NSW and Victoria from 2014. Photos: Eamon Donnelly

Milk Bars, Mixed Businesses and Corner Stores in NSW and Victoria from 2014. Photos: Eamon Donnelly

 
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I remember watching sign writers actually paint on the slogans perched high on their scaffolds for hours, long before billboards and poster prints.
— Phyllis Di Palma (nee Karamitsos) who grew up in her parents Milk Bar in Glen Huntly Road, Elsternwick
The milkman had his own key to the store and would let himself in at 3am each morning to deliver the milk and the newspapers.
— Peggy Hawking, Hawkings Corner Store, East Geelong, Victoria. 1960s - 1988
Milkos, Redskins, Frogs, Chocolate Freckels, snakes, spearmint leaves, teeth. My father would bag up the lollies every night because they always sold out. One dollar would buy one hundred lollies.
It blew my mind!
— Mirella Marie whose parents ran a Milk Bar in Glen Waverly from 1981 to 1986
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Did you grow up in a Milk Bar, own a Milk Bar or still run one today? As part of the book Milk Bars I want to tell your stories and share your photo's. The book will feature family recollections, photo’s from the family albums, interesting experiences, customer memories. 

I am seeking photo’s for the book from the family albums out there from past or present owners of Milk Bars across Australia. If your grandparents or parents or you yourself owned or own a Milk Bar and would like to contribute some of your family album snaps for the book please get in touch, or pass this on to anyone you know who has a Milk Bar connection. A lot of the time I mention the project to people and they respond with “Oh yes, my Uncle ran a Milk Bar!” This book relies on the same principle of the Milk Bar, the community spirit, a friend of a friend grew up in a Milk Bar, they might have some photo’s? 

The project is essentially focussed on Melbourne as it’s my home town and the majority of images are from here, which logistically makes sense, there’s no government grant to travel around Australia to photographs Milk Bars, but what I would love is some contributions from other states. I have travelled through New South Wales and Sydney. Other States can be featured too, Queensland families who ran ‘Corner Stores’ or South Australian & Perth’s ‘Deli’s’, after all the very first Milk Bar was opened in Martin Place, Sydney by Greek Migrant Mick Adams in 1932.

If you have a great Milk Bar history to share and would like this to be in the book please get in touch as I would love to hear from you! 

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Eamon Donnelly's Milk Bars!
Book & Project
eamonrdonnelly@gmail.com
+61.403.689.789

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DISCLAIMER
The aim of the Milk Bars Book & Project is to celebrate, curate and document a colourful archive of the Australian icon the Milk Bar. This content is published for educational, historical, research, cultural & non-commercial purposes only. If you are seeking commercial usage for any content in this project you must seek usage rights for your purposes. If you spot an image of your Milk Bar and you object to it being published in the book and project please contact me I will kindly remove the content of objection.